The Most Famous Colors of the World Club

Welcome one and all to The Most Famous Colors of the World Club! A humble little blog about a traveling, photograph taking, coffee drinking, peace promoting, Lord of the Rings/Sherlock/Hobbit fan-girling, creative writing, book loving, eclectic Pagan with a taste for ancient history! Here you will find insperational quotes/pictures, funnies, spiritual things, things related to the fandoms named above as well as some others, international awareness tid bits, videos, and whatever else I feel like re-blogging at obscure hours of the evening! Take a look around and feel free to ask me anything! Peace.Love.Coffee, Blessed Be!

nypl:

This 1928 NYPL overdue book slip was miraculously discovered in 1980 during the construction of the Tenement Museum. The Museum kept the card on display, stating that  title of the book on the card is “one of the great mysteries, we unfortunately do not know.” That is, until yesterday, when the Museum turned to Twitter for help deciphering the handwriting. Within a few hours, the mystery was solved. The book, which may have never been returned, was Israel by by Ludwig Lewisohn. A great example of the power of the Internet. 

(via escaping-the-madness)

grungybunny:

Moria Chappell

grungybunny:

Moria Chappell

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

(via nocalcalzonezone)

“God is like Robert Pattinson: It’s not the person you have a problem with; it’s the fan club that freaks you out.”

—   

Anurag Sahay (via really-shit)

this is the best analogy I’ve ever heard

(via wickedwitchelphaba)

(via jakeuptown)

Q:

A major concern in A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones is power. Almost everybody – except maybe Daenerys, across the waters with her dragons – wields power badly.

George R.R. Martin:

Ruling is hard. This was maybe my answer to Tolkien, whom, as much as I admire him, I do quibble with. Lord of the Rings had a very medieval philosophy: that if the king was a good man, the land would prosper. We look at real history and it's not that simple. Tolkien can say that Aragorn became king and reigned for a hundred years, and he was wise and good. But Tolkien doesn't ask the question: What was Aragorn's tax policy? Did he maintain a standing army? What did he do in times of flood and famine? And what about all these orcs? By the end of the war, Sauron is gone but all of the orcs aren't gone – they're in the mountains. Did Aragorn pursue a policy of systematic genocide and kill them? Even the little baby orcs, in their little orc cradles? In real life, real-life kings had real-life problems to deal with. Just being a good guy was not the answer. You had to make hard, hard decisions. Sometimes what seemed to be a good decision turned around and bit you in the ass; it was the law of unintended consequences. I've tried to get at some of these in my books. My people who are trying to rule don't have an easy time of it. Just having good intentions doesn't make you a wise king.

nicedildo:

when a book introduces a hot new character but they die like 2 pages later

image

(via seeingisoverrated)

sixfootdeep:

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

i want this printed on a t-shirt

sixfootdeep:

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

i want this printed on a t-shirt

(via tamorapierce)